5 Best Calisthenics Split Schedules: Effectively Split your Calisthenics Workout

Best Calisthenics Split

A Calisthenics Split is one of numerous ways to create a workout schedule. If you’ve just started Calisthenics, you quickly realize that there is a lot to it. There are many exercises and movements you can do, but also many ways in which you can split your Calisthenics workout apart. Most people know that it’s important to allow for enough rest between exercises, and that they can train different muscle groups on different days. Here is where a Calisthenics workout split comes into play. With the right split in your workout, your Calisthenics will be more effective and you’ll reach your goals faster. We’ll go over the most effective workout splits for your Calisthenics and how you can implement this into your own (busy) life. We’ll also present you with 5 different training schedules, all involving a Calisthenics Split and finally, we’ll look at how a professional program does it.

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What are Calisthenics Split Workout? 

A Calisthenics Split, a workout split or a training split, are training schedules based on your goals, availability, experience and recovery needs. The schedule splits your body into parts which are then trained on different occasions, usually on a weekly basis. One part of the body is trained while another is left to rest. Complete resting days may also be included into your Calisthenics workout split, depending on your level of experience. 

There is no true one-size-fits-all method of creating a Calisthenics Split. Your schedule needs to be personalized to you, so that it fits your needs and circumstances. However, there are 5 tried and tested methods where you can start implementing a Calisthenics Split into your workout schedule. These can then be finetuned to your more exact needs. This is also how a professional Calisthenics Program does it. 

 The 5 core Calisthenics workout splits are:

  1. Full Body Calisthenics Split
  2. Upper Lower Split
  3. Push Pull Split
  4. Push Pull Legs Split
  5. Body Part Split

We will discuss the framework of the training, pros and cons of each of these Calisthenics workout splits and give you our recommendations for when to use each of these.

What are the Benefits of a Split Workout in Calisthenics?

Having your Calisthenics workout split in parts has some major positive effects on the effectiveness of your exercises, as well as creating a higher degree of discipline to your workout schedule. The concept is fairly easy and the benefits are all simple to understand. But when you add them up, you’ll soon realize that a Calisthenics Split is the only way forward after only a short amount of time. We can differentiate the benefits of a Calisthenics workout split into three distinct categories. Put these three together in your mind, and you must conclude the overwhelming advantage it has over training your entire body every day. 

A Calisthenics Split Improves Recovery Times

Having an effective workout split to your Calisthenics will improve the recovery time of each muscle group. You’re not really gaining any muscle during the workout. The opposite holds true, you’re causing microscopic damage to your muscle tissue. It’s during resting that these tiny lacerations are filled up with new muscle fibers, resulting in bigger and stronger muscles. Doing a complete, train-until-failure workout for your entire body will tire you out, resulting in a much longer recovery time. The problem here is that your body has finite resources and a finite ability to recover quickly. If your entire body is worn-out, it will take progressively longer to recuperate all of it.

With a Calisthenics Split, your body will be better able to handle the recovery of each different part. The resources it has and all its recovery mechanisms can be focused on just that area, resulting in a much more efficient recovery. The end effect being that you can work out sooner and more often.

A Calisthenics Split Targets Muscle Groups Efficiently

All your muscles share the oxygen in your blood and the maximum oxygen uptake of your lungs. They’re also all depended on the same glucose reserves. Doing a single full body workout until failure means that all your muscles need to tap into this finite reserve. Once you’re depleted, that’s it. Your training won’t be effective from then on and you must stop and rest.

If you just target one muscle group or area of your body, that area can make use of almost the whole reserve to be exercised. You are concentrating your body’s efforts into a smaller set of muscles. Couple this with faster recovery time, and you’ll begin to see why a Calisthenics Split will in the medium to long run result in much better gains.  

A More Disciplined Approach with a Calisthenics Split

The last benefit we want to mention has to do with your mindset. With an efficient Calisthenics workout split that cooperates with the rest of your life, you can do Calisthenics much more frequently. You’ll also do Calisthenics at more consistent times during your week. This disciplined approach to Calisthenics helps turn it into a habit, a habit you want to cultivate and maintain for the rest of your life. This may seem like a minor benefit, but it’s not. Most people quit exercising due to a lack of discipline and consistency. If your workout schedule fits into the rest of your life and it becomes an enjoyable habit, you are much more likely to succeed. A Calisthenics Split will be essential for this.

The 5 Training Splits for Calisthenics

These are the 5 general workout splits found in Calisthenics. With these splits in your Calisthenics, you can devise a strategy that works for you and which fulfill your goals. We’ll show how each of these workout splits looks like in principle and discuss their pros and cons. We’ll also go into who is best served with this type of Calisthenics Split.

Full Body Calisthenics Split 

The Full Body Calisthenics Split is perhaps the most demanding workout split on this list. It involves movements and exercises that heavily engage many if not all muscle groups. The goal of a Full Body Calisthenics Split is to work as much of the skeletal muscle frame as possible during one session. While this may be a very tiring training method, the Full Body Calisthenics Split is usually only performed two or three times a week with resting days in-between to ensure a full recovery. To further aid in recovery and prevent an inefficient recovery, the full body exercise is sometimes not done to its full extent, e.g., past or just before failure. Instead, the practitioner will give around 80% of their maximum. 

Every workout is based on 6 to 8 exercises for 3 to 6 sets and one exercise per body part. Here is an example of a full body training schedule (in this example, you rest on Saturday and Sunday):

MonTueWenThuFr
Full BodyRestFull BodyRestFull Body

Pros of Full Body Calisthenics Split

  • It is time efficient and you can hit every single body part 2 to 3 times a week. For people with a busy lifestyle this can be a solution that still guarantees they good make progress.
  • It is good for beginners. When you just start with training, most of your gains will be achieved because of an adaptation of your central nervous system. You teach your body to be active and utilize more muscle fibers, rather than realizing physical gains in fiber size and strength. This requires greater frequency, and since the volume of work is so low, this workout should ideally be repeated three times per week, with 48 hours between workouts.
  • Evidence shows that a full body workout is very effective for fat loss and increasing strength and growth hormone production.
  • It ensures enough time for recovery, which is especially important for beginners.

Cons of Full Body Calisthenics Split

  • Less metabolic stress for each individual muscle group per training, which is necessary for hypertrophy.
  • When you get stronger, it will become harder to recover fast enough to hit the same muscle group again after just 48 hours.
  • If you train more than 3 times a week, you won’t give your body enough rest to recover.
  • Longer individual training sessions.

Our recommendation for a Full Body Calisthenics Split

We recommend a full body training for people who are looking for a beginner Calisthenics workout, want to improve their strength, lose weight and/or have a busy life. It is important to hit every body part at least twice a week to make real progress. A full body training schedule is an easy way to achieve that.

Upper Lower Split 

The Upper Lower Split is hands down the best for beginners who want to see this through long-term. This Calisthenics Split involves a very simple and easy workout structure with plenty of recovery time for each muscle group. A typical Upper Lower Split involves 4 days of exercise and 3 days of rest. The upper body and lower body are exercised in turn on consecutive days, with one day of rest in-between. A two-day rest follows to reset the body. 

Every workout is based on 4 to 6 exercises of 3 or 4 sets and 1 or 2 exercises per body part. Here’s an example of an Upper Lower body training schedule (in this example, you rest on Saturday and Sunday):

MonTueWenThuFr
Upper BodyLower BodyRestUpper BodyLower Body

Pros of Upper Lower Split

  • Upper Lower body training splits are a great next-step from a full body training. 
  • It is an easy way to increase volume per training and frequency per week. 
  • Works well for most people that want to gain size and strength concurrently.

Cons of Upper Lower Split

  • It takes more of your time because of a higher frequency of training.
  • With open chain exercises, you use a lot of muscles in the upper and lower body. This can give problems when you still have sore muscles from the day before. For example, if you want to perform a Push Up and you still have muscle pain in your legs, it will be harder to get the best out of your exercise. 

Our recommendation for an Upper Lower Split

The Upper Lower Split schedule is a good follow-up to a full body training schedule after you’ve become accustomed to regular exercise. While your goals are always the main priority, this routine will take more time and sometimes more importantly; more training moments. This is something to keep in mind, since it only takes a few missed workouts for one area of your body to throw this schedule into disarray. But if you can make it work, you can put a lot more volume in your individual training sessions and a higher training frequency during the week. This will lead to superior long-term results over the Full Body Split. 

Push Pull Split 

A Push Pull Split is reminiscent of the Upper Lower Split and is a great schedule when you want to train more than 3 times a week or even train twice a day. It is, however, a more advanced workout split. With a Push Pull Split schedule, you have two types of workouts: pull workouts and push workouts. You train each type on consecutive days, with one day rest in between and typically a 2-day rest period following that. 

With the pull workout, you will mainly hit the posterior chain of the body (upper (trapezius) and lower (erector spinea) back, legs (hamstrings), biceps, glutes). Pulling exercises like pull ups, rows, deadlifts, hamstring curls, hip thrusters are integrated in the pull workout days.

The push workout hits most of the anterior chain of the body (pectoralis, shoulders, triceps, legs (quadriceps), calves). Push exercises like push-ups, dips, squats, skull crushers and calf raises are integrated into the push workout days. 

Every workout for either push or pull days is around 6 to 8 exercises of 3 to 6 sets and 1 or 2 exercises per body part. Here’s an example of a push-pull training schedule (in this example, you rest on Saturday and Sunday):

MonTueWenThuFr
PushPullRestPushPull

Pros of a Push Pull Split 

  • Bigger volumes per training, which will increase metabolic stress.
  • Higher training frequency. With a Push Pull Split you can hit every body part at least every 72 hours, which will maximize your results on hypertrophy and strength.
  • You can use micro cycles in your training schedule. For example, the first training of the week can be a high repetition pull training (Endurance/hypertrophy) and the third training of the week a low rep pull training (strength).
  • It gives you the option to train 2 days in a row.

Cons of a Push Pull Split 

  • This schedule is advanced, especially for beginners who still need to learn the exercises and make gains on their central nervous system. 
  • The schedule requires more of your time because of a higher frequency of training.

Our recommendation for a Push Pull Split 

We recommend a Push Pull Split schedule for advanced athletes. This schedule will let you target every body part at least twice a week with a bigger volume per training than a full body schedule. You also have more freedom to train because it is possible to train almost every day. With separate push and pull days, you have two workouts in which you can target the opposite muscle of your previous workout so you will never interrupt your recovery. The fact that you have at least two training sessions of each workout type every week also makes it possible to train with different intensity per workout (micro cycle). This can make all the difference between staying on a plateau and breaching that plateau, once you’re a little more advanced.

Push Pull Leg Split 

With the Push Pull Leg Split schedule, you split your body into three parts which are each trained on consecutive day on repeat, typically with 1 day rest between two cycles Push, Pull and Leg days. On the push days you train the entire upper body pushing muscles (chest, shoulders and triceps). On the pull days, you train the entire upper body pulling muscles (back and biceps). Finally, the leg days are reserved for the entire lower body and legs (the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and abdominals). This is similar to the Push Pull Split; however, the legs are separated entirely into their own day. This allows for a very high number of training days during the week, while allowing enough rest of each part of the body.

The Push Pull Leg Split is one of the most advanced schedules you can follow. It involves a very complex format of exercises which you must maintain strictly. You can also expect to exercise 6 times a week, with very little room for skipping exercise days entirely. It can happen, of course, but you must keep these hiccups to a minimum.

Every workout type is around 4 to 6 exercises of 3 or 4 sets and 1 or 2 exercises per body part. Here’s an example of a Push Pull Leg Split training schedule:

Mon (Cycle 1)Tue (Cycle 1)Wed (Cycle 1)Thu (Cycle 2)Fri (Cycle 2)Sat (Cycle 2)Sun
PushPullLegsPushPullLegsRest

Pros of a Push Pull Leg Split  

  • You can spread out the total training volume across several training sessions. That way, you can keep each training session relatively short.
  • You can use micro cycles in your training schedule.
  • You can target every muscle group more frequently with a higher weight volume.

Cons of a Push Pull Leg Split   

  • It costs a lot of time if you want to target every group twice a week (6 training moments a week).
  • Less time for recovery for the central nervous system. Yes, you will not hit the same body part the next day but you will still stimulate your central nerve system several days in a row. This will make it harder to generate maximum strength.
  • It is easier to get injured because of the amount of load per week. 
  • Because it is very time and energy intensive, you are likely unable to follow a good stretching app or Mobility program on off days.

Our recommendation for a Push Pull Leg Split   

We only recommend the Push Pull Leg Split for athletes with a lot of training experience. It is important that you “listen to your body” when it comes to resting and that you do not train with too much volume per training session. We do not recommend this type of training schedule to beginners or people with a time-restrained schedule.

Body Part Split 

Body Part Split training schedules are used a lot in the bodybuilding scene and are not a Calisthenics Split. You focus on one muscle group per workout session, often targeting only a small number of muscles or even single muscles if possible. Each muscle group is targeted throughout the week with 5 to 7 workout days. The high frequency of training, long rest periods between individual muscle groups is often combined with repetition ranges which promote high hypertrophy over pure strength. This tends to build muscle size fast but not functional strength. 

Every workout is around 4 to 6 exercises of 3 or 4 sets. Here’s an example of a body part split training schedule:

MonTueWedThuFriSatSun
ChestBackShouldersLegsArmsAbsRest

Pros of a Body Part Split 

  • There’s a bigger “pump” because of the big volume on one specific body part.
  • No sore muscles in the body part that you will train during your next workout.
  • More specific exercises per body part.

Cons of a Body Part Split 

  • Low training frequency per muscle group per week. 
  • Possibly too much rest before hitting a specific muscle group again, which goes against the training principles like supercompensation and reversibility
  • Costs a lot of time.

Our recommendation for a Body Part Split

We do not recommend a Body Part Split training schedule for Calisthenics because it is impossible to hit every muscle group sufficiently. To gain mass and strength in a particular muscle, you need to have your next training session for that muscle group in 48 to 72 hours. If you do a body part split training schedule, you will target each body part only once a week so you will never reach your goals. This schedule is almost exclusively meant for bodybuilders who go for looks rather than functional strength.

The Key Elements of a Successful Calisthenics Split

We now have a solid grasp on the elementary beginnings of a Calisthenics workout split and have seen the 5 fundamental training splits in Calisthenics. We can now begin to understand the key elements of a successful Calisthenics Split and what it needs to be effective. This is important if we want to incorporate our own workout split into our daily lives with success. 

Plenty of Rest & Recovery for All Muscles

Recovery time is key in Calisthenics. It’s during their recovery that your muscles grow stronger and bigger. Each muscle is exercised at typically a 48 to 72 hours interval. This allows sufficient time for the repair of your muscles, while keeping up a hypertrophic state. A Calisthenics Split, in whatever configuration your muscles are separated and trained, needs to fulfil this 48-to-72-hour rest for each muscle. In other words, muscles are trained every 2 to 3 days, no less and no more. The split can incorporate a 2-day full rest to reset the entire body.

Isolate Muscle Groups as Best as Possible

To avoid overworking your muscles, your workout split should isolate your muscle groups as best as possible. Many compound exercises will have crossover to other parts of the body, which are strained or put under a light load as well during the exercise. This might be not be entirely avoidable, but your exercise selection for each type of exercise day should try and minimize crossover to other muscle groups. At the same time, it is best when individual exercises are compound exercises. This will automatically limit the number of true Calisthenics Splits you can feasibly think up off.

Maintainable for Your Schedule

It’s pointless if your workout split does not fit into your life. Be realistic with what you can do and when. For beginners this will most likely mean a Full Body Split or an Upper Lower Split, to accommodate for their relative inactivity before they started exercising. Implement whatever schedule you can realistically follow through with and worry about tweaking or upgrading it later.

As more time becomes available, or as you get more advanced and can get away with shorter but more frequent training moments, you can implement a more rigorous Calisthenics Split.

Sustainable for Your Body

Finally, your chosen Calisthenics workout split needs to be sustainable for your body. Listen to your body and know when enough is enough. Beginners will first need to activate their central nervous system to the new reality of an exercise routine. You get the most results simply by doing a full body workout two or three times a week. You can tweak the intensity of each workout until it is sustainable for you, or try either 2 or 3 workout moments every week. 

The more advanced you become, the more your body can sustain and recuperate from. However, it will also require ever more intense exercise to still see gains. At this point, a more diversified Calisthenics Split makes sense. It becomes very important that you gauge your body’s reaction carefully and adjust the frequency and intensity of your exercises. You can do this by lowering or increasing the number of exercise moments or the exercises themselves (for instance with micro cycles).

Designing Your Own Split Workout in Calisthenics

We do not recommend that you start wildly altering these existing core Calisthenics Splits as a beginner or layman. They were designed for a reason and are effective at what they do. Instead, to personalize your own Calisthenics Split it is better to only tweak the schedule and the intensity of your exercises. That way, you can pick what you know works for you, change a bit to fit your needs and adjust the intensity of your workouts to gain the best results.

How to Modify Your Workout Split

You’ve chosen a Calisthenics Split that fits your needs and availability. However, it no longer serves your goals precisely or you’ve run into time constraints. Time to tweak your Calisthenics workout split. There are 2 key areas where you can start tweaking without the primary purpose of the workout split coming undone. 

  • Exercise Frequency: adding or subtracting an exercise day/cycle to the routine you can modify, e.g., increase or decrease, both the intensity and the focus of your personalized workout split in broad strokes.
  • Exercise Intensity: increasing or decreasing the exercise intensity of each individual exercise will have a major impact on your progression:
    • Increasing or lowering the number of repetitions and sets
    • Adjusting the time under tension (how fast or slow you perform the exercises)
    • Increasing or decreasing the range of motion (ROM) of the exercise
    • Substituting exercises with either harder or easier moves.

This may require a lot of tweaking on your part. For instance, a Calisthenics Split which leaves longer gaps between body parts to be trained again, may benefit from a harder exercise every time. A more intense routine may benefit from smaller sets, or by adding weight, and so on.

It is important that the end-result of your Calisthenics Split is still a full body workout, just divided over multiple sessions. So completely stripping a muscle group or even an exercise from the routine completely cannot be done. Instead, we tweak the frequency and intensity of the exercise moments. If an individual exercise is too hard, you can substitute it for alternative easy Calisthenics Moves.

Sample Calisthenics Split Workouts

To help you with a solid setup, here are 3 sample Calisthenics Split workouts for the beginner, the intermediate and the advanced Calisthenics practitioner. 

Beginner Full Body Calisthenics Split

The beginner is best served with a Full Body Calisthenics Split. This will best activate the nervous system, which is typically what sees the fastest and biggest results for the beginner Calisthenics practitioner. 

MonTueWedThuFri
– Knee Push-Ups
– Bench Dip
– Squat
– Calve Raise
– Lunge
– Assisted Chin-Up
– Australian Pull-Up
– Scapula Pull-Up
Rest– Knee Push-Ups
– Bench Dip
– Squat
– Calve Raise
– Lunge
– Assisted Chin-Up
– Australian Pull-Up
– Scapula Pull-Up
Rest– Knee Push-Ups
– Bench Dip
– Squat
– Calve Raise
– Lunge
– Assisted Chin-Up
– Australian Pull-Up
– Scapula Pull-Up

Intermediate Upper Lower Calisthenics Split

For the intermediate practitioner, an Upper Lower Split makes the most sence. It allows for a disciplined, multi-day exercise routine which still leaves enough rest.

Mon (Upper)Tue (Lower)WedThu (Upper)Fri (Lower)
– Regular Push-Up
– Wide Push-Up
– Parallell Bar Dip
– Straight Bar Dip
– Active Hang
– Pull-Up
– Chin-Up
– Reverse Australian Pull-Up (supine grip)
– Squat
– Lunge
– Calve Raise
– Two Legs Hip Thrust
– Sprints
– Wall-Sit

Rest– Regular Push-Up
– Wide Push-Up
– Parallell Bar Dip
– Straight Bar Dip
– Active Hang
– Pull-Up
– Chin-Up
– Reverse Australian Pull-Up (supine grip)
– Squat
– Lunge
– Calve Raise
– Two Legs Hip Thrust
– Sprints
– Wall-Sit

Advanced Push Pull Legs Calisthenics Split

For the advanced practitioner, being active almost every day allows you to really focus a lot on each individual area of your body. By separating the legs from the upper and lower parts of your body, each part (legs included) will receive much more, high volume, attention.

Mon (Push)Tue (Pull)Wed (Legs)Thu (Push)Fri (Pull)Sat (legs)
– Diamond Push-up
– Archer Push-Up
– Straight Bar Dip (on top of the bar
– Parallell Bar Dip
– Pull-Up
– Chin Up
– Reverse Australian Pull-Up (supine grip)
– Assisted Bar Muscle-Up
– Squat
– Calve Raise
– Two Legs Hip Thrust
– Sprints
– Wall-Sit
– Bulgarian Split Squat
– Diamond Push-up
– Archer Push-Up
– Straight Bar Dip (on top of the bar
– Parallell Bar Dip
– Pull-Up
– Chin Up
– Reverse Australian Pull-Up (supine grip)
– Assisted Bar Muscle-Up
– Squat
– Calve Raise
– Two Legs Hip Thrust
– Sprints
– Wall-Sit
– Bulgarian Split Squat

Common Mistakes Made with Calisthenics Workout Split 

Simply doing whatever you want at a high intensity, can be detrimental to your body and your progress. Here are a few common mistakes we see with people’s training schedule.

  • They overtrain certain muscle groups over other muscle groups. You need to make sure that your weekly schedule combined gives you a wholesome, complete full body workout. Overworking your muscles will also have detrimental effects on them long-term and will diminish your results.
  • They neglect the necessary rest and recovery between workouts. A Calisthenics Split allows you to be more disciplined and better manage the energy that goes into the workout; resulting in a higher efficiency. It does not mean that you can always pack in more workouts. Your muscles need their 48 to 72-hour resting period, along with a good Calisthenics Diet.
  • They don’t keep up with the regimen or they overcomplicate the regimen. A Calisthenics Split is nothing more than separating your full body workout into manageable, consistent chunks. Pick a schedule you know you can maintain and don’t try to make it into rocket science.

Calisthenics Split in Professional Programs

Cali Move Complete Calisthenics

Get it here:

calimove.com

There are many training programs out there and many will feature a full body workout, every time. Often these will see resting days during the week, but they’re essentially a Full Body Split only. This can work for the beginner, but to progress a more refined approach is acquired. We believe that the rigidity of these programs plays a large part in why people tend to quit them after a time. A good Calisthenics Program is maintainable beyond those early stages and will eventually evolve into a more efficient workout split. We see Upper Lower Splits most typically with these programs, as they require little to no tweaking from the practitioner, while still catering to both beginner and advanced Calisthenics practitioner. 

A prime example of this progressive split would be Cali Move Complete Calisthenics. This program has a very broad application range, going from bare and maybe even obese beginner all the way to the professional athlete. If you start as a beginner, you’ll find that this program is first a Full Body Split, at low intensity. This intensity is built up over the course of 3 to 6 weeks. Then the exercise days shift into an Upper Lower Split. 

We feel that this 3-to-6-week initiation period is sufficient for most practitioners. If you’re very obese though, this period may be lengthened until you can participate in all the exercises. Regardless, of all the Calisthenics Programs we’ve reviewed so far, the Cali Move Complete Calisthenics is the clearest example of this progression from one Calisthenics Split to another. This is also why people who start with Cali Move tend to stick with it for years. The best way to get a good and effective split in your workouts is by using a program like this.

Conclusions About the Calisthenics Split

The Calisthenics Split is sometimes viewed as some kind of higher science, that’s complicated but which holds all the answers to unlocking that great body you want. The reality is that it both is the answer to great results but that it’s also a simple concept. All you’re doing is separating your full body workout over the week into targeted chunks. That way you can invest your energy more efficiently into each muscle, leading to greater results for the energy invested. All it really takes is a little strategic thinking about which muscle groups you group into a single exercise day. The whole week should see multiple of these exercise moments, together working out your whole body.

For the beginner a Full Body Split of moderate intensity makes the most sense. Your nervous system must be activated, your muscles need to learn how to move. This may sound like just the beginning, and it is, but relatively speaking you’ll gain the most results at this point. From here on, all progress becomes progressively more difficult to achieve. An effective Upper Lower Split then helps to be more efficient with your energy. Per muscle, more energy is expended to work out that muscle effectively with an Upper Lower Split than with a regular full body exercise.

The more advanced splits have their unique place as well. If you’re a very advanced practitioner who exercises almost every day, the final station would likely be separating the legs from the rest with an Upper Lower Legs split. 

Cali Move Complete Calisthenics

Get it here:

calimove.com

So, the idea is quite simple, but the execution of the idea of a Calisthenics Split is what holds most people back. There is some merit to this. Which exercises and at what intensity is appropriate for each single exercise moment, if your workout spans the whole week ─ with resting days included? What about progressing inside your current split or toward a more advanced split? Poignant questions not everyone is equipped to answer readily. 

A solid, effective Calisthenics Program is the solution for most people. But then this program does need to do this split effectively.  From our experience, the Cali Move Complete Calisthenics Program is the best example of an effective, progressive, sustainable and long-term Calisthenics Split.

Frequently Asked Questions About the Calisthenics Split

Here are a few more frequently asked questions regarding the Calisthenics workout split.

What is a Calisthenics Split?

A workout split in Calisthenics means that you take your full body workout and segment it into chunks over the course of a week. Typically, these chunks target body areas or muscle groups, like the upper and lower body or in pulling and pushing motions.

Which split is the best for a beginner in Calisthenics?

The beginner is best served with a Full Body Split of moderate intensity, which becomes more intensive over the course of 3 to 6 weeks. After that, a transition into an Upper Lower Split should occur to be more efficient with your energy.

Calisthenics Full Body or split exercise?

A split Calisthenics exercise will always be more efficient with your energy, allowing you to invest more volume of exercise into each individual muscle when taken over the course of a whole week. A Full Body exercise is typically maintained at moderate intensity for the first few weeks, after which you transition into a split Calisthenics exercise.

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